Effects of the Douglas-fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) on three species of salmonid fish
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Effects of the Douglas-fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) on three species of salmonid fish

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Published by Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, Or .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Douglas fir tussock moth,
  • Salmonidae,
  • Viruses,
  • Steelhead (Fish)

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementG. M. Banowetz ... [et al.]
SeriesUSDA Forest Service research paper PNW ; 214, USDA Forest Service research paper PNW -- 214
ContributionsBanowetz, G. M, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Forest Service
The Physical Object
Pagination6 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14841805M

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The Douglas-fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus, as part of the safety testing required for registration by the EPA, was tested on three species of salmonid fishes to determine any adverse effects. Effects of the Douglas-fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (Baculovirus) on three species of salmonid fish by Banowetz, G. M. (Gary Michael) ; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.). The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America. Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical chevreschevalaosta.com caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and Class: Insecta. The production and persistence of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, has been determined by periodic sampling of a series of natural and induced chevreschevalaosta.com have demonstrated that low prevalence rates during the early instars result mainly in larval mortality of older instars which ultimately leads to the greatest production and persistence Cited by:

Hosts: Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce Figure 8. Adult male (left) and femail (right) Douglas-fir moth. Symptoms/Signs: The caterpillar of the Douglas-fir tussock moth is grayish with brightly colored tufts of hair and a shiny black chevreschevalaosta.com are also two long horns of black hairs behind the head and another at the rear of the body. This is evidence of a recent outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars. Over the course of about three years, tussock moth caterpillars defoliated almost 16, acres of white fir forests before the naturally-occurring virus that commonly controls their outbreaks spread widely enough to return populations to background levels. Integrated pest management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth. l"or. Ecol, Manage., The Douglas-fir tussock moth is one of the most destructive forest defoliators in western North America. Densities of most tussock-moth populations fluctuate over time with considerable regular- chevreschevalaosta.com by: 5. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata Key Wildlife Value: The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees. It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to .

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban chevreschevalaosta.com moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia. The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family Erebidae.. Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another. The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive Class: Insecta. Apr 01,  · The long-term persistence of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), in forest soil has been established by bioassaying soil and duff samples from an area in which the last tussock moth outbreak took place in –Cited by: Dec 22,  · Development and Evaluation of Methods To Detect Nucleopolyhedroviruses in Larvae of the Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth, The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) How to determine the incidence of virus in egg masses. In Douglas-fir tussock moth chevreschevalaosta.com by: 6.